Travel Insurance Alerts


Sometimes, events happen that can affect available coverage for new travel insurance plans. If it is a high-profile event that can affect many of our policyholders, we release a travel insurance alert so travelers are aware that coverage for a certain event has been cut off for any plans purchased after the announced date. A list of alerts for vacation rental travel insurance plans is below.

Remember, travel insurance is designed to help protect you against unforeseen events, which means it is meant to be bought before a covered event occurs. Please contact us if you have questions about a travel insurance alert.

2020

September 17 - Hurricane Teddy
Tropical Storm Teddy strengthened into a hurricane Wednesday morning, September 16, 2020 in the Atlantic ocean. Teddy is about 610 miles east-northeast of the Lesser Antilles and 1,155 miles southeast of Bermuda, and is moving toward the northwest near 12 mph, with this general motion forecast to continue for the next few days. Maximum sustained winds are near 120 mph with higher gusts.  Teddy is a category 3 hurricane and some additional strengthening is possible through tonight, however, a slow weakening trend is expected to begin over the weekend. At this time, there are no coastal watches or warnings in effect for Teddy, but, large swells generated by Teddy are expected to affect portions of the Leeward Islands, the Greater Antilles, the Bahamas, Bermuda and the southeastern United States late this week and into the weekend.  These swells could cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions.

Customers are strongly encouraged to read their Description of Coverage or Insurance Policy for details regarding their available coverage.  For plans that do offer coverage for adverse weather and natural disasters, please note that there is no coverage for this specific storm under any plans purchased on or after September 16, 2020.

September 14 - Hurricane Sally
Tropical Storm Sally strengthened into a hurricane Monday morning, September 14, 2020 in the Atlantic ocean. Sally is about 130 miles east-southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi river and 165 miles southeast of Biloxi, Mississippi and is moving toward the west-northwest near 7 mph. This general motion is expected to continue today, followed by a decrease in forward speed and a turn toward the northwest tonight and a northward turn sometime on Tuesday.  On the forecast track, the center of Sally will move over the north-central Gulf of Mexico today, approach southeastern Louisiana tonight, and make landfall in the hurricane warning area on Tuesday or Tuesday night. Afterward, Sally is expected to move slowly north-northeastward near the northern Gulf Coast through Wednesday. Sally looks to have rapidly strengthened with maximum sustained winds currently near 90 mph with higher gusts. Additional strengthening is forecast during the next day or so.

Customers are strongly encouraged to read their Description of Coverage or Insurance Policy for details regarding their available coverage.  For plans that do offer coverage for adverse weather and natural disasters, please note that there is no coverage for this specific storm under any plans purchased on or after September 14, 2020.

September 14 - Hurricane Paulette
Tropical Storm Paulette strengthened into a hurricane Saturday night, September 12, 2020 in the Atlantic ocean. Paulette is about 65 miles north of Bermuda and is moving toward the north near 14 mph, with this general motion continuing into the afternoon.  A turn toward the northeast is expected later tonight followed by a turn toward the east-northeast and an increase in forward speed Tuesday night through Friday morning. Maximum sustained winds are near 100 mph with higher gusts and additional strengthening through Tuesday night is likely as Paulette accelerates northeastward to east-northeastward. Gradual weakening is forecast to begin on Wednesday. A hurricane warning is in effect for Bermuda, and swells generated by Paulette are affecting portions of the Leeward Islands, the Greater Antilles, the Bahamas, Bermuda, and the east coast of the United States. These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions.

Customers are strongly encouraged to read their Description of Coverage or Insurance Policy for details regarding their available coverage.  For plans that do offer coverage for adverse weather and natural disasters, please note that there is no coverage for this specific storm under any plans purchased on or after September 12, 2020.

September 3 - Hurricane Nana
Tropical Storm Nana strengthened into a hurricane Wednesday night, September 2, 2020 in the Atlantic ocean. Late Wednesday night, Nana made landfall as a small hurricane with winds near 75mph, on the coast of Belize between Dangriga and Placencia. Early Thursday morning, Nana weakened into a tropical storm and is currently moving toward the west near 15 mph, with a westward to west-southwestward motion expected through Friday night. The center of Nana will move over northern Guatemala and southeastern Mexico today and tonight, then move over the Gulf of Tehuantepec on Friday. Winds have decreased to near 45 mph and will continue to decrease in forward speed and Nana is expected to become a remnant low on Friday. All coastal watches and warnings have been discontinued for this storm, however, tropical storm conditions will continue near the center of Nana for a few more hours, and heavy rainfall with isolated maximum amounts as high as 3 to 6 inches could result in flash flooding in Guatemala and portions of southeastern Mexico.

Customers are strongly encouraged to read their Description of Coverage or Insurance Policy for details regarding their available coverage.  For plans that do offer coverage for adverse weather and natural disasters, please note that there is no coverage for this specific storm under any plans purchased on or after September 2, 2020.

August 23 - Hurricane Marco
Tropical Storm Marco strengthened into a hurricane Sunday morning, August 23, 2020 in the Atlantic ocean. Hurricane Marco weakened Sunday night and is now tropical storm status, again. Marco is about 85 miles south-southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River and is moving towards the northwest near 10 mph. Marco is forecast to approach the coast of Louisiana this afternoon, and then turn westward and move very close to the coast of Louisiana through Tuesday night.

Maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 50 mph with higher gusts.  Further weakening is expected, and Marco is forecast to become a tropical depression late on Tuesday and dissipate on Wednesday. Gusty winds, dangerous storm surge, and heavy rainfall are expected from Marco along portions of the Gulf Coast beginning later today. Currently, a storm surge warning is in effect for Morgan City Louisiana to Ocean Springs Mississippi and Lake Borgne. In addition, a tropical storm warning is in effect for Intracoastal City to the Mississippi/Alabama border and Lake Pontchartrain, Lake Maurepas, and Metropolitan New Orleans.

Customers are strongly encouraged to read their Description of Coverage or Insurance Policy for details regarding their available coverage.  For plans that do offer coverage for adverse weather and natural disasters, please note that there is no coverage for this specific storm under any plans purchased on or after August 23, 2020.

August 17 - Hurricane Genevieve
Tropical Storm Genevieve strengthened into a hurricane Monday morning, August 17, 2020 in the Pacific ocean. Genevieve is about 250 miles south-southwest of Zihuatanejo Mexico and 745 miles southeast of the southern tip of Baja California. Genevieve is moving toward the west-northwest near 18 mph, and this motion is expected to continue through tonight. A turn to the northwest and a decrease in forward speed is forecast to occur on Tuesday and continue through at least early Thursday.  On the forecast track, the center of Genevieve is expected to move parallel to but well offshore the coast of southwestern Mexico during the next couple of days.

Maximum sustained winds are near 75 mph with higher gusts.  Rapid strengthening is forecast to continue over the next day or so, and Genevieve is expected to become a major hurricane on Tuesday. A weakening trend should begin on Wednesday. At this time, there are no coastal watches or warnings in effect, however, Genevieve is expected to produce large swells across portions of the southern coast of Mexico today and will spread northward along the southwestern and west-central coast of Mexico to the Baja California peninsula through Wednesday. These swells are likely to cause life- threatening surf and rip current conditions.

Customers are strongly encouraged to read their Description of Coverage or Insurance Policy for details regarding their available coverage.  For plans that do offer coverage for adverse weather and natural disasters, please note that there is no coverage for this specific storm under any plans purchased on or after August 17, 2020.

August 11 - Hurricane Elida
Tropical Storm Elida strengthened into a hurricane Monday, August 10, 2020 in the Pacific ocean. Elida Is about 250 miles southwest of the Southern tip of Baja California. Elida is moving toward the west-northwest near 14 mph, and this heading with a gradual decrease in forward speed is expected through Thursday. Maximum sustained winds are near 90 mph with higher gusts.  Some slight strengthening is possible this morning, but steady weakening is forecast to begin late this afternoon and continue into Thursday. At this time, there are no coastal watches or warnings in effect, however, swells generated by Elida are expected to affect portions of the coast of west-central Mexico and the southern Baja California peninsula during the next day or two.  These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions.

Customers are strongly encouraged to read their Description of Coverage or Insurance Policy for details regarding their available coverage.  For plans that do offer coverage for adverse weather and natural disasters, please note that there is no coverage for this specific storm under any plans purchased on or after August 10, 2020.

July 31 - Hurricane Isaias
Tropical Storm Isaias strengthened into a hurricane Thursday night, July 30, 2020 in the Atlantic ocean. Currently, Isaias is about 365 miles south-southeast of Great Abaco Island and 295 miles Southeast of Nassau. Isaias is moving toward the northwest near 16 mph, and a general northwestward motion with some decrease in forward speed is expected for the day or so followed by a turn toward the north-northwest.  On the forecast track, the center of Isaias will continue to move near or over the Southeastern Bahamas today and is forecast to be near the Central Bahamas tonight, and move near or over the Northwestern Bahamas Saturday and near the east coast of the Florida peninsula Saturday afternoon through Sunday. Maximum sustained winds are near 75 mph with higher gusts.  Some strengthening is possible today and tonight, and Isaias is expected to remain a hurricane for the next few days. A hurricane warning is in effect for North of the Deerfield Beach to the Volusia-Brevard county line and a Hurricane warning has been put in place for the Northwestern and Southeastern Bahamas.

Customers are strongly encouraged to read their Description of Coverage or Insurance Policy for details regarding their available coverage.  For plans that do offer coverage for adverse weather and natural disasters, please note that there is no coverage for this specific storm under any plans purchased on or after July 30, 2020.

July 22 - Hurricane Douglas
Tropical Storm Douglas strengthened into a hurricane Wednesday, July 22, 2020 in the Eastern Pacific ocean. Douglas is about 1,785 miles east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii, and is forecast to turn west-northwest and increase speed by late Wednesday. Maximum sustained winds have increased to near 75 mph with higher gusts with additional strengthening expected over the next day or two.  Some weakening could begin on Friday once Douglas begins to move over cooler waters. At this time, there are no coastal watches or warnings in effect, but the forecast cone from the hurricane center shows the storm could approach the Hawaiian islands by the second half of this weekend, and there is an increasing chance that strong winds and heavy rainfall could affect portions of the state beginning on Sunday.

Customers are strongly encouraged to read their Description of Coverage or Insurance Policy for details regarding their available coverage.  For plans that do offer coverage for adverse weather and natural disasters, please note that there is no coverage for this specific storm under any plans purchased on or after July 22, 2020.

January 29 - Coronavirus Outbreak
The Coronavirus outbreak is considered a foreseeable event as of January 29, 2020. This means coverage is unavailable for losses related to the Coronavirus if the insurance plan was purchased on or after January 29, 2020.

COVID-19 was formally declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization on March 11, 2020. For insurance plans that exclude pandemics, coverage is unavailable for losses that occurred on or after March 11, 2020. Plan exclusions for a pandemic can vary according to your state of residence and the plan you purchased. To review your coverage details, please see your Description of Coverage or Insurance Policy.

For any plans that include coverage for losses due to sickness, we are providing coverage if you, a family member, or a traveling companion contract COVID-19 and plan requirements are met. Eligible coverages can include Trip Cancellation prior to your scheduled departure, Trip Interruption, Travel Delay, Medical and Dental, and Emergency Assistance and Transportation coverage during your trip.

Customers are strongly encouraged to read their Description of Coverage or Insurance Policy for details regarding their available coverage.

January 8 - Puerto Rico Earthquake
Puerto Rico was struck by a magnitude 6.4 earthquake the morning of January 7, 2020. Roughly two-thirds of Puerto Rico remains without electricity, many still don't have water and frightened residents were staying outside as a series of aftershocks rocked the island following the large earthquake. It hit before dawn Tuesday, leaving a man dead and causing dozens of homes and structures to crumble and was centered off Puerto Rico's southern coast, 6 miles south of Indios. Governor Wanda Vázquez Garced declared a state of emergency and activated the Puerto Rico National Guard as she pleaded with residents to remain calm and prepare for aftershocks.

Customers are strongly encouraged to read their Description of Coverage or Insurance Policy for details regarding their available coverage. For plans that do offer coverage for adverse weather and natural disasters, please note that there is no coverage for this specific storm under any plans purchased on or after January 7, 2020.